No Gravatar

Fact Friday: Organizing and productivity facts Organize to Revitalize Blog“In the first empirical study into how these orientations originate, researchers found that how adolescents perceive their parents’ work ethic is central to the development of their own work attitudes. People who perceive their father to have a strong career-orientation are more likely to be career-oriented themselves—but career-determined mothers have no effect on their kids’ work orientation. 

Read More:

Are You a Workaholic? Blame Your Parents | TheAtlantic.com |12.5.13

 

 

Related Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Product or book links are affiliate links.

 

 

Tagged with:  
No Gravatar

Fact Friday: Organizing and productivity facts Organize to Revitalize BlogA 2013 survey conducted by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) found that 44 percent of U.S. adults feel a high level of financial stress. As seasonal expenses loom, these worries intensify.

‘People are very afraid right now,’ says stress management psychotherapist Steve Rosenberg of Elkins Park, Pa. After being in practice for 33 years, he recognizes the signs of pre-holiday worries. ‘Halloween, Thanksgiving and beyond, everyone is looking at the price.’”

Read More:

3 Ways to Curb Pre-Holiday Money Stress| FoxBusiness.com |10.29.13

 

 

Related Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Product or book links are affiliate links.

 

 

Tagged with:  
No Gravatar

Fact Friday: Organizing and productivity facts Organize to Revitalize Blog“…researchers found that after being deprived of sleep, participants displayed greater craving for high-calorie junk food. The more sleep-deprived they were, the greater the cravings. By contrast, when they were well rested, the same people were better able to resist temptation.”

Read More:

Why the Sleep-Deprived Crave Junk Food and Buy Higher Calorie Foods| Spring.org.uk | 11.14.13

 

 

Related Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Product or book links are affiliate links.

 

 

Tagged with:  
No Gravatar

Fact Friday: Organizing and productivity facts Organize to Revitalize Blog“Telecommuting has been shown to improve productivity and reduce working costs. A study done by Staples Advantage showed that 54% of businesses that have employees who telecommute say that it has led to a recognizable increase in productivity.”

Read More:

Telecommuting: The New Green Business| SMBCeo.com | 10.30.13

 

 

Related Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Product or book links are affiliate links.

 

 

No Gravatar

Fact Friday: Organizing and productivity facts Organize to Revitalize Blog“…it appears that the ability to multitask is more of an illusion, than a bona fide skill. In reality, we should be on a mission to break our multitasking obsession. While we have the ability to switch between tasks — we do not have the ability to attend to all of them effectively. Recent studies have documented that performance can drop significantly when attempting more than one task, and this becomes more of a challenge as we age.”

Read More:

Why Focus Should Really Be the Next “Big Thing” |  LinkedIn.com  | 10.3.13

 

 

Related Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Product or book links are affiliate links.

 

 

Tagged with:  
No Gravatar

Fact Friday: Organizing and productivity facts Organize to Revitalize Blog“As people get more anxious, they are more likely to label neutral smells as bad smells (Krusemark & Li, 2013). So, anxiety literally makes the world stink. And as people get more anxious they become better at distinguishing between different bad smells (Krusemark & Li, 2012).”

Read More:

8 Fascinating Facts About Anxiety | Spring.org.uk  | 10.3.13

 

 

Related Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Product or book links are affiliate links.

Tagged with:  
No Gravatar

Fact Friday: Organizing and productivity facts Organize to Revitalize Blog“Interestingly, research has shown that six-minute naps, known as ultra-short sleep episodes, can improve declarative memory (i.e. a type of long-term memory that pertains to our ability to recall facts and knowledge).

Read More:

The science behind power naps, and why they’re so damn good for you | i09.com | 9.26.13

 

 

Related Information

Take a Nap! Change Your Life.by Sara Mednick, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Product or book links are affiliate links.

Tagged with:  
No Gravatar

Fact Friday: Organizing and productivity facts Organize to Revitalize BlogWorkers who ate healthy meals and exercised on a regular basis had better job performance and lower absenteeism, research from the Health Enhancement Research Organization (HERO), Brigham Young University and the Center for Health Research at Healthways shows. Employees who eat healthy all day long were 25 percent more likely to have higher job performance, the study found, while those who eat five or more servings of fruit and vegetables at least four times a week were 20 percent more likely to be more productive.”

Read More:

What you eat at work can impact on your productivity |News.com.au | 9.17.13

 

 

Related Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Product or book links are affiliate links.

Tagged with:  
No Gravatar

Fact Friday: Organizing and productivity facts Organize to Revitalize Blog“The mere circumstance of being poor can reduce a person’s cognitive abilities by consuming precious mental resources. ‘We’re not saying the poor are dumber,’ said study researcher Sendhil Mullainathan, an economist at Harvard University. ‘It’s as if being poor is like pulling an all-nighter, every night.’ Mullainathan compared doing mental tasks while being poor with surfing the Web while a movie is downloading in the background. ‘It’s going to be much slower.’”

Read More:

Poverty Saps the Brain’s Mental Reserves | LiveScience.com | 5.29.13

 

 

Related Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Product or book links are affiliate links.

Tagged with:  
No Gravatar

Fact Friday: Organizing and productivity facts Organize to Revitalize BlogMental concentration works like how a muscle does. Your brain needs to take occasional breaks in order to resume optimum performance. Forcing yourself to get everything done in one sitting will eventually exhaust you and drain you out. In fact, it’s advisable to take breaks at least every fifteen minutes according to Dr. James Levine, a professor at the Mayo Clinic and a supporter of “nap breaks” in the office. He says our bodies are not made for sitting for hours on end so we have to move around to get the blood sugar system going.

Read More:

Why Goofing Off Just Got Serious | Under30CEO.com | 9.3.13

 

Related Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Product or book links are affiliate links.

Tagged with: